Monday, December 29, 2008

Prosciutto Log Appetizer

This recipe comes to you from my friend Titti, an enthusiastic member of a group I belong to called "Le Matte del Lunedi," or "The crazy ladies of Monday." We meet each week to chit-chat in Italian, drink espresso (and sometimes prosecco, I won't kid ya') and eat wonderful food prepared by that week's hostess. It makes you
want to learn Italian just to be part of the group and eat the scrumptious food. Titti is always ready to help out anyone who needs an extra hand and frequently arrives with a special treat to help the hostess, as in the case, the prosciutto log.

The group is comprised of accomplished women who hail from nearly all parts of Italy. Titti is from the Liguria region, others from Lombardy, Friuli-Venezia-Giulia, Lazio, Campagna, and more. The discussion can range from family to politics, but almost always touches on the subject of food. With so many good cooks from so many regions of Italy, the food at the weekly meetings is always special. Once a year, we invite the husbands for an annual picnic where the ladies (and men) really pull out all the stops, culinarily-speaking. It's an event no one wants to miss. I'll be sharing more of the ladies' recipes in the blog in the coming months. With New Year's approaching, you might want to include Titti's prosciutto log on your menu.

The recipe calls for prosciutto cotto, which translates to cooked ham. The cured prosciutto most of you know and love is called prosciutto crudo, or raw ham. Don't use that in this recipe. Look in a specialty food shop for prosciutto cotto. If you can't find real prosciutto cotto from Italy, used boiled ham instead, not smoked ham like a Virginia ham. Another substitute that is very close to prosciutto cotto is something that my local market sells called "French ham." It's as delicate in flavor as prosciutto cotto, but you'll want to trim the fat and gelatin around the edges first. At many supermarkets, you'll find something called "parmacotto," but that's not quite right for this recipe, since it normally contains a lot of other flavorings.

Prosciutto Log

1 pound prosciutto cotto, sliced
2 sticks softened butter
2 tsps. cognac
freshly ground black pepper
20 green olives, cut into small pieces

In a food processor, place the prosciutto cotto, butter, cognac and black pepper. Pulse until everything is smooth and well blended. Add the green olive bits and mix in with a spoon. Roll into a log shape and wrap tightly with plastic wrap. Chill for a few hours before serving. Serve with bread rounds. To make a prettier presentation, trim the slices with a scallop-shaped cookie cutter, and decorate the plate with fennel fronds, as Titti did.

2 comments:

Stacey Snacks said...

Linda,
Can I join Le Matte del Lunedi? I am married to an Italian, though I am just an honorary member!

The prosciutto log looks terrific.
Stacey

Ahmz said...

This looks fabulous, I love it. Nice recipe. thanks